Ten Most Amazing Alaskan Malamute Facts

The Alaskan Malamute is the one of the most famous primitive dogs. This is a favorite dog breed in North America, and for the good reason! The Malamute is a dog of great strength, very similar to Arctic wolf, which is actually his ancestor. This is a dog of many virtues, an ideal companion for every experienced owner. He is tough and has an excellent sense of smell and direction, which is why he is often used in all sorts of polar expeditions and competitions. So, here are ten most interesting Alaskan Malamute facts.

1.) The name of this Nordic primitive dog was given after the Mahlemuits, an Inuit tribe from the upper western region of Alaska. Today this tribe is known under the name Kobuk. These native Eskimo people actually developed this dog, who is considered to be the most beautiful of all polar dogs.

2.) The Alaskan Malamute is the biggest of all Nordic Sledge Dogs. Adult males can grow up to 27,5 inches (70 cm) in height, and can weigh up to 100 pounds (45 kg).

3.) Although Malamutes are very similar to Siberian Huskies, which are known to be the fierce competitors in mushing competitions, they are rarely used for dog sled racing. They possess all the qualities needed for this kind of competition, they’re agile, strong, and highly endurable dogs with great senses, but the main reason they aren’t used as often for dog sled racing is their size. However, they often compete successfully in weight pulling or dog agility trials.

4.) Of all the Alaskan Malamute facts mentioned here, perhaps the most interesting and terrifying one is that during the World War II this breed was almost extinct. It is calculated that only thirty registered Alaskan Malamutes left alive in 1947. Thanks to Mr. Robert J. Zoller, who combined Hinman/Irwin and M’Loot dogs to create the Husky-Pak line, the breed was later renewed. However, they inherited, more or less, some characteristics of other breeds involved in the process.

5.) The Alaskan Malamutes appeared as the memorable characters in the novels of Jack London and Rudyard Kipling.

Alaskan Malamutes are known to be very strong and agile dogs

Malamute is a literal powerhouse!

6.) During the long history of this breed, Malamute dogs have been involved in some of the most noble human endeavours. They were loyal companions of the prospectors and miners, who came to Alaska in 1896, during the Klondike Gold Rush. Also, Malamutes together with Huskies were aiding Rear Admiral Richard Byrd in his expedition to the South Pole. In World War II, Malamutes in Greenland were used as rescue dogs, while in the same period in Europe, they were used for hauling all sorts of freight.

7.) In recent past, Alaskan Malamute was used a lot less as a working dog, and has become a family companion dog, who is known to be particularly nice and careful with children.

8.) Although this dog breed in the past had an inborn habit to establish a pack hierarchy, similar to many other Nordic breeds, this has been successfully reduced lately by applying the method of selective breeding in order to develop better and much stronger companionship with their owners.

9.) Unlike a Husky‘s coat, the Malamute‘s thick double coat has not evolved enough to withstand high temperatures and tropical climates, which is why it’s advisable to keep your dog in cooler or shaded space during hot days with a lot of cold water.

10.) This breed, as it is unfortunately case with all other polar breeds lately, is prone to canine diabetes. It often occurs in the middle of their lives, when they are 6 or 7 years old. There is no certain evidence what’s the cause, but it is thought that the occurrence of this disease is in connection with dietary and environmental factors.

This will conclude our list of the most interesting Alaskan Malamute facts. Since this is our first post of this kind, we hope you’ll like it. And, of course, there will be more of them in the future. See ya soon!

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